News

Public-private collaboration award nomination

BEC NEWSLETTER – August 2021

As the sector ponders the future for hydrogen here, the World Energy Council has released a new report “Hydrogen on the Horizon – Ready, Almost set, Go?”.

Public-private collaboration award nomination

Hopes for hydrogen and Southland

Hydrogen as a source of energy has been around a long time and promised much.
Perhaps, as a green fuel, its time is coming. Perhaps a tipping point is close where hydrogen’s place in the fight against climate change becomes significant.

Public-private collaboration award nomination

TIMES New Zealand Agriculture Webinar

As we transition to a net-zero carbon economy by 2050, policy makers, investors and consumers are searching for tools to help them manage risks and seize opportunities.

Exploring paths towards hydrogen

Exploring paths towards hydrogen

Right now hydrogen is getting a lot of attention. Many countries are focusing on producing hydrogen for fuel, or procuring it, or planning for its future use.
Hydrogen fuel is highly desirable – clean hydrogen produces none of the harmful emissions of other energy sources.

Public-private collaboration award nomination

TIMES New Zealand Transport Sector Webinar

What transport technologies might help us lower our carbon footprint? What cars might we drive? And what fuels might we use? How do our two scenarios, Kea and Tui, compare? Our modelling shows petrol emissions are almost all eliminated between 2050 and 2055 in Kea, and 2055 and 2060 in Tūī. So what might we be driving instead?

Public-private collaboration award nomination

TIMES New Zealand Residential and Commercial Sectors Webinar

What energy source might we use in our homes? What is the potential for homes to reduce carbon emissions? What could the emissions footprint of the commercial sector look like? Where might we see emissions increase? How do our two scenarios, Kea and Tūī, compare?

Public-private collaboration award nomination

TIMES New Zealand Transport Sector Webinar

What transport technologies might help us lower our carbon footprint? What cars might we drive? And what fuels might we use? How do our two scenarios, Kea and Tui, compare?

Our modelling shows petrol emissions are almost all eliminated between 2050 and 2055 in Kea, and 2055 and 2060 in Tūī. So what might we be driving instead?